Lechon kawali, Pan fried pork belly on a bun

Pan-fried pork or lechon kawali as we Filipinos call it, is also a favorite among the inhabitants of the pearl of the orient.

Lechon kawali or Pan-roasted pork to some is different from Lechon, the well-known national dish of the Philippines. The difference between the two is that lechon is cooked in a pit filled with flamed charcoal, lechon kawali is cooked by boiling or baked then later deep fried, the most common part to use  is pork belly, or as the Filipinos call it liempo

This dis is usually eaten with steamed rice and some lechon sauce for dipping, but this time I served it in a bun with bbq sauce with chicharon on the side.

How to Cook Lechon Kawali

Cooking Lechon Kawali takes two processes, usually you boil the pork belly until tender, and then deep fry it in oil.  I baked mine and I pan-fried it.  You can prepare the pork belly a day or two before serving it. NB,  do not slice it and store in the fridge until you need it.

lechon-kawali-fried-pork-belly-milk-bread-filipino-analiza-gonzales.jpg

You need

Pork belly
Crushed garlic
Salt
Pepper

Oil for frying

Burger buns or Japanese milk bread. I used the latter, for recipe see HERE
lettuce
Onion
Bbq sauce

Score the skin of the pork belly and rub it with crushed garlic, salt and pepper.

Preheat oven to 200 C

Wrap the pork belly in aluminium foil, put it in the oven and turn down the heat to 120 C and bake it in the oven for about 5 hours.

lechon-kawali-fried-pork-belly-milk-bread-filipino-analiza-gonzales.jpg

When the pork belly is finish, cut slices and remove the skin. Fry the slices in a pan with a little oil, and the skin you deep fry.

The only thing left is to build your sandwich, serve and enjoy.

lechon-kawali-fried-pork-belly-milk-bread-filipino-analiza-gonzales.jpg

 

 

 

Raggmunkar, swedish potato pancakes

Feeling a little peckish I looked through the fridge and seeing what I had on hand I felt like making potato pancakes, swedish potato pancakes like the ones I had on Gotland last year. I could raggmunkar and also make something for a challenge Mia from Green Bonanza started in September. This is a challenge for Norwgian foodblogers, each month one foodbloger will be in charge by choosing the theme of the month and follow up on the other bloggers. This months theme is potatoes and the challenger is Ina behind the blog Mat på bordet. You will find pictures from the challenge on Instagram under #oppskriftsutfordringen, you can also find links to this challenge at Matbloggsentralen Facebook page.

Continue reading “Raggmunkar, swedish potato pancakes”

Tonkatsu, Japanese schnitzel or Dongas in Korean

Exploring some of my Japanese heritage, funny thing though, I was 14 when I first ate at a Japanese reataurant. My great great grandfather was Japanese, unfortunately I do not know his name, but my great grand father was Pedro Nakamura y Gonzales. There can’t be that many Filipinos back then with that name so if anyoneelse has ties to him or know of him please let me know. He was married to Gabina Platon Burgos. One of my many hobbies is geneology, but I am sort of stuck with my side of the tree. My childrens three on their father side I have been able to go back centuries.

Tonkatsu is the japanese version of a Schnitzel, made with thin slices of pork sirloin. Originally these were made with beef and called Katsuretsu. It is said that the pork version was invented at a restaurant in Tokyo called Renegatei in 1899. The dish was seen as a “Yoshoku” a Japanese version of European cuisine. Some say that it was the Portuguese who brought Tonkatsu to Japan in the late 1800s. The portuguese arrived much earlier and at the end of the 1800s. In this period of history many countries had attempted to get a foothold in Japan, so who brought the dish to japan is somewhat uncertain, my theory i that it was those who invented the wiener schnitzel.

Tonkatsu is usually served with thinly sliced cabbage and a dark sauce called Tonkatsu sauce, a type of mustard (Karashi) and preferably with a slice of lemon or two along with rice and miso soup.
When we lived in South Korea we got it served with kimchi and kim and the dish is called Dongas. Kim is the same as Nori, the difference between Kim and Nori is that Kim as a side dish is often toasted with a little oil and lightly salted.
We often bought kim in little rectangular pieces, you it by placing a pice on top of your rice and pick up a mouthful of rice with chop sticks. If you want to eat this with kimchi, HERE is a recipe.

Tonkatsu sauce

1 dl ketchup
1/2 dl Worchestershire sauce
1/2 dl sake
1 tbsp grated fresh ginger
1 tbsp grated fresh garlic
1-2 tsp of sugar
3 tbsp mirin

Combine all the ingredients in a saucepan and bring to a boil and stir-
Turn down the heat and simmer for 25-30 minutes. Remove the foam that forms on top and let the sauce cool slightly before serving.

Tonkatsu
500 g pork sirloin
salt and pepper to taste
2 eggs
4-5 tablespoons flour
salt and pepper to taste
4 dl panko crumbs
Oil for frying, not olive oil

Cut the meat into thin slices, about 1/2 cm thickness. If you want you can give the pieces a couple of whacks with a meat tenderizer. Salt and pepper slightly or to taste.

Pour oil in a deep sauce pan and set on medium heat.


Beat the eggs, salt and pepper in a bowl.
Put the flour and panko in separate bowl.

Flour both sides of the meat and make sure it is completely covered, then dip it in the egg and finally in panko crumbs
Fry until golden.
Keep the meat warm in the oven in an ovenproof dish at approximately 150 ° C while you fry the rest.
If you are going to eat this with chop sticks, cut the Tonkatsu into strips before serving.Plate the tonkatsu and serve it with rice and miso soup, and other side dishes you want.

Banh xeo, Vietnamese sizzling crepes

I have been wanting to try this crepe at a Vietnamese restaurant in Oslo, but each time I have been there I have been too late, either they have been out or that they have stopped making them for the day.

I saw the pan cake on instagram @kokofoodie, now I really had to try them. They looked so good and crunchy, I love crunchy. Earlier I had only heard about the crepes, from my friend Frk. Fabelaktig, she is my source for Vietnamese food and when we have a lunch date we usually got to a restaurant in Oslo called Lille Saigon 1, this restaurant even got a raving review in the New York Times a little while ago. Since I have not tried the real deal yet, I can’t compare my crepe with a Vietnamese made one. I really have to get my glutinous maximus to this restaurant ASAP. Anyhow after googling I decided to try out this recipe with my twist on it of course:D

  • 500 g rice flour
  • 2-3 cups water
  • 2 cans coconut milk
  • 1 tbsp ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 bunch spring onions (scallions), chopped
  • vegetable oil

Filling

  • 500 g cooked pork belly thinly sliced ( I had leftover pork roast)
  • 500 g bean sprouts
  • onion, sliced (I used scallions and garlic, I was out of onion)
  • 500 g small fresh raw shrimps,I removed the heads
  • Lettuce, Vietnamese basil, mint and coriander leaves, to serve

 

Prepare the filling and prepare the batter by mixing the rice flour with water, coconut mik, turmeric, salt and chopped shallots.

In a frying pan, heat just enough oil to cover the pan (tip-off excess) and fry a spoonful of the scallion and garlic(onion), shrimps and for a couple of minutes.

Pour batter mixture into the pan. Tilt the pan so that the mixture spreads thinly.  When the batter begins to crisp around the edge, add some pork, bean sprouts and chopped scallions.beansprouts. Make sure the edges do not stick to the pan by brushing a little more oil around the edge of the pancake.

Fold one half of the pancake over the ingredients and slip onto serving plate. Serve with fresh herbs.

 

 

Mung bean stew with moringa leaves, Ginisang Munggo na may Malungay

Mungbean stew with moringa

The first time I ate up my plate with mung bean stew  volunterly was when I was 18, I had just moved to California and visited my cousin and his family one week-end. I was crying inside, but ate my Munggo. Sitting at the table watching everybody, I realized that I was considered an adult and I could not sit and whine and say “I don’t like that” and make gagging noises.

I do not have any fond childhood memories attached to this dish and I must admit I hated it. I made gagging noises as soon as i heard the word Mungo or smelled the dish. But today it is different, I love legumes. Thanks to my stay in the US I got over a lot of my pickiness. A good thing that taste is not written in stone and you are allowed to change your mind.

Gninisang mungo na may malungayMunggos are the same thing as mung beans(Vigna radiata), a plant species in the legume family. The beans are native to the Indian subcontinent. It is used as an ingredient in both savory and sweet dishes.

The most famous Mung bean dish in the Philippines is the “Ginisang Munggo”, sautéed Mung Bean. This dish makes use of Mung beans as the main ingredient complimented by different flavors from meat, seafood, and vegetables, a hearty and healthy dish.

The green leaves I have used are Malunggay leaves or Moringa in english and apparently they’re one of the world’s superfood. This herb is best known as an excellent source of nutrition and a natural energy booster. Loaded with nutrients, vitamins and amino acids, it replenishes your body and provides what you need to get through a hectic weekday or active weekend.

Foe this dish you can use fresh baby spinach if you can’t find Moringa. Chop it up and use it in the exact same way.

Mungbean stew with morringa recipe1  cup Mung beans

1 tbsp minced garlic

250 g pork, thinly sliced

1 medium-sized tomato, chopped

1 medium-sized onion, chopped

10  medium-sized shrimp (optional)

2 tbsp fish sauce

1 liter water(for boiling)

1 pc pork/beef cube or 1 teaspoon beef powder (for flavoring)

1-2 cups chopped or pulled malunggay leaves (or spinach)

salt and pepper to taste

 

 

Wash mung beans thoroughly and strain.

Soak beans in water and stir. Remove floating particles.

In a saucepan, sauté garlic, onion and pork, when the pork is done add the chopped tomatoes.

Pour in beans with water, add stock cube and bring to a boil. Turn the heat down to medium heat and simmer, stir occasionally until beans are tender about 30-40 minutes.

Add the shrimps and when the shrimps are done add the malungay leaves.

Eat this with rice or bread.

Mungo

Larb moo, lovely minced meat salad

TV can be a source for inspiration, after watching a re-run of DDD, I had to make this dish.

Larb (ลาบ) is a mince meat salad, and regarded as the national dish of Laos, but this dish is also known as a Thai dish from the north-eastern region of Isan.

The minced pork is wonderfully seasoned with fish sauce, chili flakes, lime juice, toasted sticky rice for texture, and an assortment of fresh herbs to bring it all together.

I served the larb with lettuce leaves and a papaya slaw, for recipe go HERE

Larb 4 agj

1 dl chopped shallots

2  shredded garlic cloves

1 tablespoon of chili flakes

400 grams  minced pork

1 tablespoon of palm sugar

1 tablespoon of fish sauce

1/2 tsp Sriracha sauce, how much depends om the heat you want

1 – 2 limes

long leafed coriander or regular coriander

3 – 5 spring onions (green onions)

About 20 leaves or so of fresh mint

Iceberg lettuce or hearts of romaine leaves

First step is to make the toasted rice (khao kua ข้าวคั่ว).

khao kua 1 agj

Fry uncooked sticky rice in a dry frying pan on low to medium heat, Stir continuously, roast the rice until it turns from white to golden-yellow and fragrant, almost like popcorn . It takesabout 15 minutes or so.

Once the rice is finished roasting, and has cooled off a bit, put it into your stone mortar and pestle. Pound the rice until it turns into a coarse powder or use a blender or food processor. Put your toasted sticky rice powder in a bowl aside.

Larb (ลาบ)
Saute shallots, garlic in a pan with oil, when the onions are glossy, add the chili flakes and stir before you add the minced pork.
Larb5 agjFry the pork, breaking it into small minced pieces, until it’s cooked and add a large spoonful of crunchy sticky rice
Take the pork off the heat, and add palm sugar, fish sauce, Sriracha sauce and squeeze in the lime juice.
Give the pork and the seasoning a quick stir, pluck about 20 or so of mint leaves off the stem. Throw everything into the saucepan with the pork.
 –
Give the larb moo a good mix, making sure all the spices and dressing coats the pork.
 –
Taste test. See if it needs more fish sauce for saltness, lime juice, or chili flakes. Get it the way you want it.
 –
Serve this with a green papaya salad or the papayaish slaw I made.
Papaya salad 1 agj
Place a large spoonful of larb in a lettuce leaf, top with papaya salad fresh herbs and more crunchy rice.
2016-02-08 16.12.48 larb 7 agj

Asian styled pork leftovers

Juleribbe is one the traditional dishes Norwegians eat during Christmas, pork belly slow cooked in the oven on low heat and then broiled to give the pork rind a nice crisp. If you have some left over after Christmas dinner, it is usually served thin sliced as cold cuts for Christmas day breakfast.
I made some chicken wings with a Vietnamese style marinade and thought why not make the sauce for the Christmas pork leftover, if you do not have any leftover I guess you can use any type of fried or baked pork.
Syrup
3 tsp minced garlic
1/2 tsp grated ginger
1,5 dl fish sauce
2 tbsp oyster sauce
1 tbsp plum sauce
1 dl sugar
1 tbsp cooking oil
Garnish(use as much as you want)
Chopped fresh mint leaves
Chopped fresh coriander/cilantro
Chopped fresh chilies.
Saute garlic and ginger in a pan with a little oil. Add the rest of the ingredients and lett it cook in to a thick syrup.
Fry your pork left over and when the pieces are done pour the syrup over your pork, make sure every piece is coated and sprinkle the chopped herbs and chili.
Serve this with fresh vegetables like shredded carots, julienned cucumbers, snow peas and rice, I used wild rice.
Happy left over eating:)

Pork Adobo recipe

When the Spaniards came to the Philippines they came uo on a people who cooked their food in vinegar, and called this dish Adobo wich means to marinate / marinade in spanish. What the ingredients was in a pre-spanish adobo we do ot know, except that it contained vinegar.
Todays the Filipino adobo is made different from region to region, I’ve even read a recipe with coconut milk.
This dish can be made with different types of meat, but the most common is chicken and pork.
Todays version is with pork

1 kg pork belly or chops

150 ml soy sauce
2 tbsp sugar
2 tbsp crushed garlic
1 onion
4-6 Dried bay leaves
1 tbsp whole peppercorns
50 ml vinegar
250 ml water
Salt to taste
Etter på steker man opp kjøttet
Combine the pork, soy sauce, garlic and sugar in a bowl an let the pork marinade for an hour or so.
Saute the onions in a deep pan and add the marinated pork saute for a few minutes to seal the meat.
Add the rest of the ingredients pluss the marinade and bring to a boil, turn down the heat and simmer for about 1,5 hours
Salt to taste.
Serve hot with rice and vegetables. Share and enjoy!