Genki

Genki desu ka?元気ですか?Or Genki for short is the closest thing to “How are you?” in English.  But in Japanese it literally means, “Are you fine/healthy?”

One of the newest  addition to Oslo’s restaurant scene is Genki (元気). A japanese restaurant located at Vika terasse not far from the main street of Oslo Karl Johans gate and the Royal Palace. The restaurants head chef Vladimir Pak and his team mix the long and old nippon traditions smootly with Nordic flavours, giving you a taste voyage through traditional Kaiseki setting in a new and innovative way. They strive to use only Norwegian and Japanese produce that you can enjoy in a modern and pleasant environment.

Clock wise from top left: 1. Rice cracker with lemon and pepper, from the kaiseki menu. 2. Salmon tartar and wakame. 3. Maki with tuna tartar, ox tongue tartar and king crab. 4. Ceviche miso, from the kaiseki menu

At Genki you can lower your shoulders, relax and enjoy the staffs informal interaction with you, were they make sure that you will have and enjoy a wonderful and tasty experience. In Vladimir Pak hands you will surely get a quality meal, he secured a third place in the World Sushi Championship last year.

Kaiseki is a traditional multi course Japanese dinner. The term also refers to the collection of skills and techniques that allow the preparation of such meals, and is analogous to Western haute cuisine. Genki offers three different menus for dinner, a fourteen course kaiseki menu, you can enjoy all fourteen or sample two or three. If you are vegan, you too can enjoy a few dishes too and if you are vegetarian you can enjoy a few more. They also serve a set three coarse meal and maki menu with a vegetarian option.

Price wise this place is decent. The fourteen course meal cost NOK 825,-  about US$ 98,-  or Euro 88,- in today’s currency exchange. You can see two of the dishes in the second picture from the top.

You can also go and enjoy lunch at Genki. The lunch menu is shorter and not so elaborate as the dinner menu, you have the choise of four meals to choose from. The bento box in picture above is from their lunch menu, crispy tonkatsu, ceviche miso with toasted pumpkin seeds, mixed salad with sesame dressing, vegetable maki, fried maki with salmon and steamed rice. As my bento box was placed in front of me, an older petite japanese lady came in the door. I could hear her say that she had just heard about the place and wanted to try it out, she happened to order the same as me. I could not help myself and as she was paying I popped by and asked her if she enjoyed her meal and how she would compare it to a traditional japanese meal. She said it was very tasty and she enjoyed it very much and it was a lot of food, she was not used to so much for lunch.

Vegetarian maki, Genki Vika terasse, Oslo, Analiza Gonzales, Japanese
Vegetarian maki

Genki shares a kitchen with Omakase by Alex Cabiao the newly opened Oslo version of the only Michelin stared sushi restaurant i Norway, Sabi Omakase in Stavanger wich is runned by Alex’s  previous apprentice Roger Askila Joya. The Oslo based Edomae style restaurant as the name suggests will be headed by Alex Cabiao the grand master of sushi here in Norway and among the top sushi chefs in the world. He has trained every renowned sushi chef in this Nordic country.

The team of chef at Genki right to left Jonathan Romano, Alex Cabiao, Mark Subia, Vladimir Pak

A not so known member of this Sushi family is Mark Jayson Subia who also is an apprentice of Alex. He won the Global Sushi Challenge in Oslo in 2015 and represented Norway in Tokyo. Praised by both Alex and Jonathan, they predict that we will hear more from this guy in the future.

I give this place a thumbs up and if you are in Oslo, Norway, I recommend that you come and visit these places.

Breakfast or dinner? Low carb tosilog

 Low carb tosilog

Baybayin: To si lo

Low carb dish inspired by the Filipino breakfast Tosilog. garlic fried cauliflower rice, tomatoes drizzled with hot and spicy cane vinegar, tocino marinated pork chop, fried egg, marinade with extra soy sauce and hot and spicy vinegar reduced to a sauce, sautéed bok choi topped with fried shredded sweet potato an onion rings.

I wanted some tocino, but I only had pork chops in the fridge, so I made a tocino marinade.  This time I used salty liquorice syrup from Johan Bulow Lakrids instead of anise liquor. My brother had told me that he had used Sambuca or Hot and sweet to make tocino, so why not this liquorice syrup. Since I am using the salty kind I did not need to add any salt to the marinade.

HERE is a previous Tosilog Recipe and post.

4-6 pork chops
1 cauliflower
3-4 minced cloves of garlic
4-6 bok choi
4-6 eggs
1 sweet potato
1 onion
2 tomatoes
3 tbsp Hot and spicy vinegar(If you do not have this use white wine vinegar and add a                                                                  little chopped chilli, garlic and crushed pepper)
Salt and pepper to taste
4-5 tbsp soy sauce

Marinade
0,5 dl sugar
0.5 dl salty liquorice syrup, you can use any anise or liquorice liquor
2,5 dl pineapple juice
1 whole crushed garlic no matter how many cloves
1 small chopped onion
1 tbsp anatto seeds

Mix all the marinade ingredients in a blender to make the marinade. Blend to a smooth mixture.

Pour the marinade over the meat and marinade for at leat 3 hours in room temperature or over night in the fridge.

Cauliflower rice with garlic.

Finely chop the cauliflower and mince the garlic

Fry the garlic  and cauliflower in a little oil. Salt and pepper to taste.

Sauté the bok choi with a little soy sauce.

Shred sweet potato and cut onion rings, Fry the shredded sweet potato and onion rings crispy

Heat 1 tablespoon vegetable oil in a pan over medium heat. Brown chops in hot oil, about 5 minutes per side; remove pork to a plate.

Pour the marinade into the pan and add 2 tablespoon soy sauce and 2 tablespoon spiced cane vinegar reduce the liquid until it starts to thicken.

Fry  the eggs
Tosilog

Plate on individual plates or put every thing on the table and let everybody serve themselves.

Light and airy chinese fold-over buns

Steamed buns is a snack that I have grown up with, my dad used to make siopao a Filipino version of the chinese buns. These fold-over buns is something that I have gotten to know in the recent years, quite an ingenious way to make them, this way you can fill them with what you want to put in them. I do not know who originally made these, but for mine I have used my dads siopao bun recipe.
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After a quick steam, these pockets are like tender pillows ready to be stuffed with a cooked filling of your choice.
Makes about 20 buns, depending on the size.
250 ml luke warm water
3 tablespoons sugar
1 packet dry yeast
3 tablespoons canola oil
800 ml all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
 –
 Combine warm water, sugar and yeast in a bowl, add oil, salt and flour
Mix everything together and knead to a smooth dough. Cover the dough and let it rise in a warm place until doubled in size.
Flatten the dough and sprinkle on the baking powder and knead to a soft and flexible dough.
Divide the dough into about 20 equal parts and shape them in to round buns, roll the buns into an oval shape  twice as long than it is wide.
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As you can see in the picture below I rolled the dough quite thin, but they rise nicely and becomes soft and airy when steamed.
Place a baking paper on top of your rolled dough and place a small jar lid on before you fold it in two, this way you get a nice pocket to put your filling.

Place buns in a bamboo steamer lined with parchment, then cover loosely with plastic wrap.  Let the buns rise for about 15-20 minutes in a warm, draft free place, long enough for them to have just doubled in size.  Meanwhile, fill a large wok or pot up with water to a depth of 4″.  Set the water on high heat to reach a full boil.

Place the bamboo steamer filled with risen buns on top of wok or pot, remove the plastic wrap and place the bamboo lid on, and steam the buns for about 8-10 minutes, or until they are light, fluffy, and puffy.  Your Chinese Fold-Over Buns are now ready to be stuffed with a filling of your choice or just eat them plain.
For these fold-over buns we mixed a little east and west and had pulled pork with julienned cucumber and spring onion, pickled red cabbage and hosin sauce. MiniMe dropped hoisin sauce and the red cabbage, she used bbq sauce on hers.
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Fill yours with the filling of yoour choise and enjoy 🙂