Kare kare, oxtail and peanut stew

Kare kare recipe

Kare-kare is a Filipino stew with a thick savory peanut sauce. It can be made from a stock made with different types meats and parts of the cow, but it is common to just use oxtail and a mix of vegetables. This stew is flavored with ground roasted peanuts and peanut butter, onions, garlic and shrimp paste(bagoong). It is colored with annatto (extracted from annatto seeds in oil or water) and can be thickened with toasted sticky or plain ground rice. Its name derived from the word “kari” from the word “curry”. However, kare-kare is far different from Indian curry. Kare-kare has a similar flavor to satay because of the peanuts in the sauce.

There are several stories to the origins of kare-kare. The first one is that it came from Pampanga. Kare-kare is a well-known dish in Pampanga, which is often hailed as the culinary capital of the Philippines. Another has it coming from the regal dishes of the Moro (muslims) who settled in Manila pre Spanish colonization. Another is from Sepoy conscripts from Southern India that settled in Philippines during the British occupation of Manila 1762-1764. Longing for their home cooking, they improvised and used available ingredients. They called it kari-kaari, curry, and now, kare-kare.

Some enjoy this with extra shrimp paste on the side. With their spoon they take a spoon full of stew and rice, then a tiny bit of the shrimp paste to give it a bit of umami. To be honest it is a bit too much umami for my taste.

Karekare recipe

Dinner for 4:

3 lbs oxtail
1 large chopped onion
Water to cover the meat in your pot
2,5 dl peanuts, ground
1 dl sticky rice toasted and ground
1 tsp anatto oil or powder
1 tsp minced garlic
1 banana bud, peel and separate the banana flowers and slice the rest thin
bok choy
string beans
1 tsp shrimp paste(optional)and salt and pepper to taste

4 servings of rice

 

Brown the meat in a pot, add the onion and cover the oxtail and onions with water. Bring to a boil,urn down the heat and let it simmer for 2.5 to 3 hrs or until tender.

Filipino ox tail stew recipe

Once the meat is tender, add the ground peanuts, peanut butter, ground sticy rice and annatto simmer for 5 to 7 minutes.
In a separate pan, saute the garlic then add the banana flower, bok choi and string beans and cook 5 minutes
Transfer the vegetables to the large pot, add shrimp paste, salt and pepper to taste.
Serve hot with rice and enjoy this with shrimp paste or not:D

Pumpkin and shrimps in Coconut milk, ginataang kalabasa na may sugpo

Ginataan

My mum has been visiting and she came with me shopping and saw the pumpkin and the shrimps in the store and wanted to make one of her favorite dishes. Pumpkin and shrimps coconut stew or as it is called in the Philippines, Ginataang kalabasa na may sugpo.Filipino coconut, pupmkin and shrimp stew

1 chopped onion
4 cloves minced garlic
2 tbsp minced fresh ginger
3 chilis or more or less depending on how hot you want it.
1 can coconut milk
1 box coconut cream
1 small pumpkin remove seeds, peel and cube
1 kilo large shrimps
3-4 Bok choy bouquets
1-2 tbsp fish sauce
salt and pepper to taste

Saute onion, garlic, ginger and chili in a pot until soft and fragrant.

Add coconut milk, coconut cream and pumpkin cubes and bring to a boil.

Ginataan kalabasa

Turn down the heat and let it simmer until the pumpkin is getting soft, then add the shrimps and let it simmer about 5 minutes before you add the bok choy.

Add fish sauce, salt and pepper to taste.

When the bok choy is starting to wilt the stew is ready.

Serve with rice.

Munggo with lechon

 

Mungo with lechon

My cousine have never made mung bean stew when I come over for a bite to eat, because she knew that I used to hate it, but last time I went to visit her she hade made a pot of the stew. I read on your blog that you like munggo now, so I made some.

Wow, this was a munggo dish I never tried befor. My cousin had made this stew with Lechon left overs and it tasted heavenly, had I had this type of mung bean stew when I was younger I would have liked it a  lot more. HERE is the recipe for the mung bean stew I have been used to.

You make this stew the same way you make the traditional stew, but with roasted pig that you call lechon in the Philippines. As greens this time I have used Corchorus known as Saluyot in the Philippines. Rumor has it that this herb is one of Cleopatras anti wrinkle remedies, you can read about it HERE.

1  cup Mung beans

1 tbsp minced garlic

chilipepper flakes for heat if you want

300-500 g Lechon left overs( use what you have)

1 medium-sized tomato, chopped

1 medium-sized onion, chopped

2 tbsp fish sauce

1 liter water(for boiling) if you want this more like a soup add more water

1 pc pork/beef cube or 1 teaspoon beef stock(for flavoring)

1-2 cups chopped or pulled malunggay leaves (or spinach)

salt and pepper to taste

Wash mung beans thoroughly and strain.

Soak beans in water and stir. Remove floating particles.

Mung bean stew 1 agj

In a saucepan sauté onion, garlic and pepper flakes, add lechon and chopped tomatoes.

Pour in beans with water, add stock cube and bring to a boil. Turn the heat down to medium heat and simmer, stir occasionally until beans are tender about 30-40 minutes.

Right before serving add the saluyot leaves, do not boil the leaves, they will become very slimy.

Mussles in coconut milk, Ginataang tahong

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I was visiting my mum and she made Ginataang Tahong or Mussels cooked in Coconut Milk for dinner, this dish is a common Filipino dish. I understand that mussels are abundant and cheap in coastal areas so a dish like this is a regular feature on the dining table.

I usually eat mussels with bread or fries, but since this a Filipino dish we enjoy this with rice.

 

1 kg fresh mussels, cleaned

1 regular can coconut milk

1 medium onion, minced

2 cloves garlic, crushed

2 tbsp ginger, cut in thin strips

1 cup chopped spinach

1 tbsp fish sauce

Chili, salt and pepper to taste

2 tbsp cooking oil

 

Heat the cooking oil in a cooking pot, saute the garlic, onion, and ginger

Pour-in the coconut milk and let it boil and thiken a bit.

Add, spinach, fish sauce, chili, and salt and pepper to taste

Put the mussels in the pot, stir and cook for 3 to 5 minutes or until the mussels open up

Serve with steamed rice or noodles. Share and enjoy!

 

 

Tocilog, filipino brakfast dish and an easy tocino recipe

Tosilog as I know it, is a popular Filipino breakfast. The name derives from the different components of the meal, tocino (cured pork), sinangag (garlic fried rice), and itlog(egg).

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I do not have a problem eating this for breakfast, but it has become more of a lunch or a dinner dish in my house.

This tocino recipe is a cheat, I used pork that is already lightly salt cured, so I do not have to bother with the curing with salt and sodium phosphate, thick bacon without smokey flavour

The tocino I have made myself for years has been by using Mama Sitas Tocino powder, and is not quite the same as the one I like from the Philippines. The home-made tocino I have tasted here in Norway have been missing something and I have not been able to recognize the missing flavour. Then someone told me that there was sweet anise liquor in the marinade. I just had to buy anise liquor next time I was travelling, since I have not been able to find it in Norway. My brother told me that he used Sambucca and Hot & sweet(Scandinavian licorice snaps) and still got great results, but of course with a slight taste difference in the finished result.

Fun fact, liquorice is a popular candy flavour in Scandinavia and it has become quite popular in Scandinavian cooking.

Tocino
1 kg salted side of pork sliced in 0,5 cm thickness
1 dl sugar
0.5 dl anise liqueur
1 cup pineapple juice
1 whole crushed garlic no matter how many cloves
1 small chopped onion
anatto powder or red dye

2016-02-07 19.59.45 tocino agjCombine all the ingredients in a except for the meat in a blender and blend into a smooth mixture.

Put the pork and marinade in a container, rub the meat and make sure that the mixture is evenly distributed across the meat. Cover the container

Store the covered container in room temperature for 14 hours or in the fridge refrigerated, but that would take at least 3 days to complete.

Cook tocino by boiling it with water that almost cover the meat and some of the marinade on medium heat. The meat gets tender as the water starts to boil. After a while, the water evaporates and the fat from the pork will be left. This will fry the meat. Make sure to turn the meat over after a few minutes of frying to cook the opposite side of the tocino. Doing this will give you a tender and delicious pork tocino that is cooked just about right.

Sinangag

3 cups cooked white rice (leftover Jasmine rice is preferred)
5 cloves crushed garlic
2½ tablespoons cooking oil
½ teaspoon sea salt

Heat the cooking oil in a wide pan.

While the cooking oil is being heated, add the crushed garlic. Note: make sure that the oil is not hot when you add the garlic. Let the garlic slowly cook while the oil gets heated until it becomes golden brown and crisp.

Add-in the rice; gently stir to distribute the ingredients. Continue to cook for 3 minutes.

Sprinkle the salt over the rice and continue to mix all the ingredients gently. Cook for another 3 to 5 minutes.

Fry eggs.

Transfer to a serving plate.

Share and enjoy!

Tocino made with liquorice syrup

Pancit Palabok

“Come over for dinner Analiza I’ll make you some Pancit Palabok” my cousin texted me, she is along with my mum one of my sources for Filipino food.

Pancit palabok is another example of Filipino’s love of noodles. This noodle dish though comes covered with a thick red shrimp-flavored sauce, and a mishmash of toppings such as fried garlic bits, boiled shrimp, smoked fish flakes, crushed pork cracklings and hard-boiled eggs.

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The first time I tried this dish was as a kid, at a Filipino party I was handed a plate with noodles slathered in red meat sauce, and thinking it was something else I took a big bite. It wasn’t something else it was this dish, my face stiffened in a probably strange grimace and I might have gaged too as little children sometimes do. Today though I like the dish, they say that if you try something 25 times you will begin to like it.

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Serves 4

1 pack (1 lb) rice noodles (bihon)

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Sauce

2 tbsp cooking oil

400 g ground pork

1 tbsp anatto powder

3 cups pork broth

1 piece shrimp cube( bullion)

3-4 tablespoons cornstarch, 1/4 cup cold water

2 tbsp fish sauce

½ tsp ground black pepper

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Toppings

2 pieces fried firm tofu (tokwa), cubed

½ cup tinapa flakes (smoked fish)

½ cup chicharon, pounded(pork rind)

2 hard boiled eggs,sliced

½ cup cooked shrimps (boiled or steamed)

¼ cup green onion or scallions, finely chopped

3 tbsp fried garlic

2 pieces lemon, sliced (or 6 to 8 pieces calamansi)

2015-04-12 04.09.00

Instructions

Soak the rice noodles in water for about 15 minutes. Drain and set aside.

Saute the minced pork in a deep pan with oil until cooked, about 5 minutes.

Dilute the annato powder in pork broth then pour the mixture in the saucepan.

Bring to a boil (If you are using anatto seeds, soak them first in 3 tbsp water to bring-out the color)

Add the shrimp cube and stir and simmer for 3 minutes

Add the corn starch mix gradually while stirring.

Add the fish sauce and ground black pepper then simmer until sauce becomes thick. Set aside.

Meanwhile, boil enough water in a pot.

Place the soaked noodles in a strainer (use metal or bamboo strainer) then submerge the strainer in the boiling water for about a minute or until the noodles are cooked. (make sure that the noodles are still firm)

Remove the strainer from the pot and drain the liquid from the noodles.

Place the noodles on a serving plate.

Pour the sauce on top of the noodles then arrange the toppings over the sauce.

Serve with a slice of lemon or calamansi. Share and enjoy!

Pancit Canton

Pancit Canton is a Filipino Noodle dish with chinese heritage. Pancit has Hokkien origines, pian i sit  which literally means “convenient food. For me and most other Filipinos pancit means noodles

Pancit Canton

In the Philippines this dish is usually served at birthday and other celebrations, the noodles represent long life and good health, but the noodles used must not be cut short so not to corrupt the symbolism.

A typical Pancit Canton makes use of sliced pork, sausage, shrimp and different kinds of vegetables.

I have used chicken, ham and shrimps for my recipe.

1 pack (1 lb) pancit canton (flour noodles)

1 onion, sliced

1 teaspoon minced garlic

3/4 lb chicken breast thinly sliced

1/2 lb raw shrimps, cut in half length wise

1/4 lb cooked ham, diced

3-2 carrots sliced thin diagonally

3 stalks celery cut thin diagonally.

2 cups chicken broth

6 tablespoons soy sauce

2 tablespoon oyster sauce

2 tablespoons cooking oil

pepper to taste

Prepare all your ingredients before cooking
Pancit Canton recipe
Boil water for the noodles
Saute onion, garlic and chicken i a pan with oil, when the chicken is almost cooked trough, then add carrots, baby corn, fry until the chicken is done.
Add celery, shrimps and ham, lastly add oyster sauce, soy sauce and half the broth.
Remove from heat and start cooking your pancit noodles according to the package.
When the noodles are done, drain.
Place your pan back on high heat and add the noodles and stir.
If it is a little to dry add some more broth and stir.
Enjoy and Happy longevity 🙂
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Siomai, delicious pork and shrimp dumplings

Siomai is a traditional Chinese dumpling and one of the more famous of the dim sum dishes. This dumpling comes with different filling depending on the local tradition, pork, shrimp, beef, pork and shrimp, and topped with carrots and peas.

Traditionally these dumplings are steamed but they can also be fried.

Homemade siomai agj

1/2  lb raw shrimp or prawns shelled and deveined

1/2 lb minced pork, not the lean kind, the dumplings will be to dry

8-10 finely shopped water chestnuts

2 stalks scallions, finely chopped

1/4 teaspoon ground white pepper

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

2 teaspoons oyster sauce

1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

1/2 teaspoon finely grated fresh peeled ginger

1 package wonton wrappers

Carrots for garnish, finely cubed

 

Finely chop the shrimps, water chestnuts and scallions.

Combine all the ingredients in a bowl and mix.

Set filling aside in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes, but best if you leave it overnight.

making siomai agj

Before I start wrapping the filling I roll it in to little balls, about a tablespoon.

To wrap the siomai, place 1 wonton wrapper in the palm of your hand.

Place about a ball or 1 tablespoon of filling in the middle of the wrapper.

Bring two opposite corners towards each other, and press gently to adhere them to filling. Repeat with remaining 2 corners to form a little cup around the filling, gently squeezing to hold wrapper in place.

Making siomai 2 agj

Add a little bit of the diced carrots on top and set aside. Continue wrapping the remaining siomai.

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To steam, line your steamer basket or tray with parchment paper, cabbage leaves can also be used. Pour enough water into your pot and bring to a boil.( I did not use anything for the picture sake)

Arrange siomai in the steamer basket, leaving room around each one so they won’t stick together.

Steam fresh siomai until cooked through, about 10 minutes.

Serve, eat them plain or with a dipping sauce.

Uncooked siomai can be frozen, so make a big batch and freeze the ones you are not going to eat right away and enjoy them later.

Dumpling sauce agj

Dumpling sauce

1/2 cup soy sauce

1/2 cup rice vinegar

2 cloves of finely chopped garlic

1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

1 stalk of scallion, chopped

 

Combine all the ingredients in a bowl and let it sit while you make the siomai.

Fried dumpling agj
Same dumpling, but folded differently and fried.

Arroz caldo, filipino comfort food

This must be one of the Filipinos top comfort foods and to me a cherished childhood dish. Arroz caldo I belive to be the Filipino equivalent to chicken noodle soup, when ever I was feeling a bit under the weather my dad would make this for me.
Arroz caldo is a spanish interpretation of the chinese congee, a rice porridge made with broth. Directly translated arroz caldo means rice broth.
My father used to make this with homemade chicken stock and a lot of ginger.
For 4 servings you need
1/2 onion, finely chopped
5 cm long fresh ginger, grated
2 cloves crushed garlic
2 tablespoons olive oil.
1.5 L chicken stock
2.5 dl paella rice
Cooked meat of one chicken.
1 spring onion
crispy crushed garlic
Salt and pepper to taste
A little chili if you want an extra kick.
Saute the onion until it becomes shiny with a little olive oil in a pan, add garlic and grated ginger and fry a bit more, then add chicken stock and bring to a boil.
I used an immersion blender to crush everything to smooth soup, but you do not have to if you don’t want to.

Next step is to add the rice and bring boil, when boiling lover the heat to medium to low and let the porridge simmer untill the rice is cooked. At the end add the cooked chicken and let it simmer some more until the chicken meat is warmed through.

Serve the in bowls and garnish with chopped spring onions, crispy garlic bits and chili.

My dad used to put in a few strands of saffron, but since I did not have any this time I just skipped it.

Kaldereta, Filipino stew

This dish with Spanish influence is a popular in the Philippines and often served on special occasions and a regular in every Filipino cookbook.

My family loves Beef Kaldereta and this was my dad speciality. This stew as with any stew it takes time and patience but it is worth the wait.
According to Wikipedia this was originally made with goat meat. Today it is more common to use beef, but you can use chicken or pork too, my dad used to hunt elk and made the stew with self caught meat. I prefer beef and I must admit that when I heard that you had to use liver pate to make the sauce nice and smooth, I was a little skeptical, but I’ve never noticed any liver taste before, so why should I react now. It’s actually the first time I make it, my mother made one on the top and bottom picture and mine is in the middle.
Kaldereta comes from the word caldero meaning cauldron

You need

 

 

1 kilo beef, cubed
1 large chopped onion
3 crushed garlic cloves
4 tbsp olive oil
1 dl soy sauce
2 tbsp white wine vinegar / lemon juice
4 bay leaves
2 cans crushed tomatoes
4 tablespoons tomato paste
2 Red bell pepper cut into strips
1,5 dl liverspread
5 dl potatoes cubed
2 dl green olives
2 dl green peas
2-3 chilli pepper (optional)
A handful of chopped parsley for garnish
Saute beef, onion, garlic in olive oil, add the bay leaves, soy sauce and white wine vinegar and bring to a boil, when it starts to bubble, put the heat down to second lowest and let the meat simmer under cover until tender.
I let it simmer for approximately 2 hours
Remove the liquid, but save it for later.
Add tomatoes and tomato paste with the beef , stirring and add the liquid you just drained a little at the time and taste till you get the saltines you want.

Add the rest of the ingredient and let it simmer untill the potatoes are tender.

Eat this with rice.