Light and airy chinese fold-over buns

Steamed buns is a snack that I have grown up with, my dad used to make siopao a Filipino version of the chinese buns. These fold-over buns is something that I have gotten to know in the recent years, quite an ingenious way to make them, this way you can fill them with what you want to put in them. I do not know who originally made these, but for mine I have used my dads siopao bun recipe.
 –
After a quick steam, these pockets are like tender pillows ready to be stuffed with a cooked filling of your choice.
Makes about 20 buns, depending on the size.
250 ml luke warm water
3 tablespoons sugar
1 packet dry yeast
3 tablespoons canola oil
800 ml all-purpose flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
 –
 Combine warm water, sugar and yeast in a bowl, add oil, salt and flour
Mix everything together and knead to a smooth dough. Cover the dough and let it rise in a warm place until doubled in size.
Flatten the dough and sprinkle on the baking powder and knead to a soft and flexible dough.
Divide the dough into about 20 equal parts and shape them in to round buns, roll the buns into an oval shape  twice as long than it is wide.
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As you can see in the picture below I rolled the dough quite thin, but they rise nicely and becomes soft and airy when steamed.
Place a baking paper on top of your rolled dough and place a small jar lid on before you fold it in two, this way you get a nice pocket to put your filling.

Place buns in a bamboo steamer lined with parchment, then cover loosely with plastic wrap.  Let the buns rise for about 15-20 minutes in a warm, draft free place, long enough for them to have just doubled in size.  Meanwhile, fill a large wok or pot up with water to a depth of 4″.  Set the water on high heat to reach a full boil.

Place the bamboo steamer filled with risen buns on top of wok or pot, remove the plastic wrap and place the bamboo lid on, and steam the buns for about 8-10 minutes, or until they are light, fluffy, and puffy.  Your Chinese Fold-Over Buns are now ready to be stuffed with a filling of your choice or just eat them plain.
For these fold-over buns we mixed a little east and west and had pulled pork with julienned cucumber and spring onion, pickled red cabbage and hosin sauce. MiniMe dropped hoisin sauce and the red cabbage, she used bbq sauce on hers.
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Fill yours with the filling of yoour choise and enjoy 🙂

 

Pancit Canton

Pancit Canton is a Filipino Noodle dish with chinese heritage. Pancit has Hokkien origines, pian i sit  which literally means “convenient food. For me and most other Filipinos pancit means noodles

Pancit Canton

In the Philippines this dish is usually served at birthday and other celebrations, the noodles represent long life and good health, but the noodles used must not be cut short so not to corrupt the symbolism.

A typical Pancit Canton makes use of sliced pork, sausage, shrimp and different kinds of vegetables.

I have used chicken, ham and shrimps for my recipe.

1 pack (1 lb) pancit canton (flour noodles)

1 onion, sliced

1 teaspoon minced garlic

3/4 lb chicken breast thinly sliced

1/2 lb raw shrimps, cut in half length wise

1/4 lb cooked ham, diced

3-2 carrots sliced thin diagonally

3 stalks celery cut thin diagonally.

2 cups chicken broth

6 tablespoons soy sauce

2 tablespoon oyster sauce

2 tablespoons cooking oil

pepper to taste

Prepare all your ingredients before cooking
Pancit Canton recipe
Boil water for the noodles
Saute onion, garlic and chicken i a pan with oil, when the chicken is almost cooked trough, then add carrots, baby corn, fry until the chicken is done.
Add celery, shrimps and ham, lastly add oyster sauce, soy sauce and half the broth.
Remove from heat and start cooking your pancit noodles according to the package.
When the noodles are done, drain.
Place your pan back on high heat and add the noodles and stir.
If it is a little to dry add some more broth and stir.
Enjoy and Happy longevity 🙂
  • 2016-01-17 18.35.28

Spring rolls

This was first posted August 23, 2012 in Lizas matverden
Me: What do you want for dinner?
Dan: Spring rolls.
And mummy tries to indulge her children.
2016-01-17 18.32.33

400 g Minced beef
1 tablespoon oil
200 g thinly sliced cabbage
1 piece finely chopped onion
2 cloves crushed garlic
1 piece grated carrot
3 tablespoons sweet chilli sauce
1 tablespoon soy sauce
1 tablespoon fish sauce (Asian)
12 large/24 medium spring roll sheets

 

Saute onion and garlic in a pan and add the beef when the onion looks sweaty, then add cabbage, carrots and the sauces.

When everything is cooked drain the filling in a strainer you want the filling to be a bit dry.

Make the rolls (see pictures below).

Fry in a pan or in a deep fryer.
Served this with a salad, sweet chilli sauce and rice.

 

For chili sauce recipe look HERE.

I used this brand of spring roll sheets, 25 x 25 cm. Since I was making smaller rolls I cut them diagonally, but you can buy smaller spring roll shets. This is what I had available at home.

 Put some filling on a sheet.

Start rolling

Fold one side

Roll again

Fold the other side

and finish rolling.

Sio pao with chicken asado

Siopao agj

Yummy ligth and airy buns filled with sweet savory filling. Siopao is the filipino equvalent to Cha siu bao ( steamed bbq pork filled buns). I remember my dad make these buns when I was growing up, I did not like the buns with filling back then, but now I do. When I was growing up he made the plain one for me as I have done for my children.

Siopao 3 agj

These buns are easy to make, follow the recipe and you are on your way, just make sure you have all the ingredients, I didn’t and made it with chicken and not pork.

Dough recipe

Makes about 20 buns, depending on the size

250 ml/1cup luke warm water

3  tbsp sugar

1 packet dry yeast

3 tablespoons canola oil

800 ml all-purpose flour

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

Filling ingredients:

500 g chicken, chopped into small pieces

1  onions, half chopped and the other half sliced

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 carrots diced in different sizes(for texture)

2 stalks of scalions sliced

1 tbsp lard, shortening or oil

2 tbsp soy sauce

1 tbsp sugar

2 tbsp oyster sauce

1 tbsp hoisin sauce

1 tbsp cornstarch, diluted in 1/8 cup water

Salt and pepper to taste.

 

Start by making the dough.

Combine warm water, sugar and yeast in a bowl, add oil, salt and flour

Mix everything together and knead to a smooth dough. Cover the dough and let it rise in a warm place until doubled in size.
Flatten the dough and sprinkle on the baking powder and knead to a soft and flexible dough.
Divide the dough into about 20 equal parts and shape them in to round buns, flatten the buns and place a spoonfull of filling in the middle before you close them up.
Place them on small squares of baking paper and place them in a bamboo steamer and cover, let them rise to double the size.
Sio pao filling agj
Next make your filling saute the onion, garlic and chicken in a little bit of oil, when the  chicken is done add the carrots and the rest of the ingredients exept the cornstarch and water.
When everything is cooked and incorporated then add the cornstarch and water.
PhotoGrid_1453384239601
Filling the buns.
Divide your dough in atleast 20 equal parts, roll each part into a ball, flatten by rolling with a rolling pin,
and place a good spoonfull of filling in the middle close them up and put them on a piece of bakingpaper before you put them in the steaming basket.
Remember to give them space so they do not swell into eachother. Cover them and let them rise to double the size befor you steam them,
Steam over a wok or a pot with boiling water for about 10 minutes.

Har Gow, Crystal Skin Shrimp Dumplings

Stretchy translucent dough filled with plump moist chunks of shrimps, this might be the most popular dim sum dumpling.

The filling for har gow is very straightforward, shrimp and pork fat, but for these that I have made, I have used an egg white instead of pork fat. I was also out of bamboo shoots, so I used water chestnuts instead.

Har gow 1 agj

Filling

300 g raw shrimps or prawns

2 tbsp finely chopped bamboo shoots
 or water chestnuts

1 tsp soy sauce


1 tsp Shaoxing wine or dry sherry

1/2 tsp toasted sesame oil


1 stalk scallion

1/2 tsp grated fresh ginger

1 tsp cornstarch


1/2 egg white

1/4 tsp ground white pepper


Mix the filling ingredients together and let stand on the counter while you make the dough.

Har gow 3 agjWrappers

1 1/4 cup  wheat starch (not flour)

1/4 cup tapioca starch

1 cup boiling water


1 tbsp lard or neutral oil( I used oil)

Har gow 4 agj

Combine wheat starch and tapioca starch n a medium bowl, pour in the boiling water and add the lard while mixing in one direction with a spoon or dowel.

While it’s hot, knead the dough for about 5 minutes or until smooth but firm. If the dough is too sticky add a bit more wheat starch.

When done the dough should be soft and not sticky.

Divide the dough into 4 equal parts and roll each section into an 8-inch-long sausage. Place dough in a bowl and cover with plastic wrap, so it won’t dry out.

Har gow 5 agjCut the dough again in 8 equal parts. Place a piece of dough between two small pieces of parchment and flatten with the backside of a heavy clever or underside of a pan. Then, using a dumpling dowel or a small rolling-pin, start to roll from the center out, until you get a 3 to 4 inches disc in diameter and betweet 1/16 to 1/8-inch thick . Place the finished wrappers back in a plate and cover until you finish rolling out the remaining dough.

The thinner you roll the dough the more translucent it will be.

Har gow 7 agj

 

Filling the wrapper

Pleat one edge of the wrapper and make it into a cup.

Drop a teaspoon of filling into the center of the wrapper, try not to get filling on the outside edge, press together the smooth and pleated sides to lock in the filling.

Place dumplings in a steamer, cook on a wok or a pot over full steam. Steam over high heat for 8-10 minutes.

Serve and enjoy with a dipping sauce and remember that the dumplings can be scalding hot right away.

The best part with these dumlings besides the taste, they did not stick to the steamer 🙂

Dumpling sauce

1/2 cup soy sauce

1/2 cup rice vinegar

2 cloves of finely chopped garlic

1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

1 stalk of scallion, chopped

Har gow 6

 

 

Bulgogi

Bulgogi is a popular Korean dish made with thinly sliced beef that is pre marinated with various seasonings on  a bbq pan and preferably over hot coal. The first time I tasted this dish was the hotel we stayed at when we moved to South Korea back in 2007, it was one of the fixed dishes at their breakfast buffet.

Since it is to cold to barbecue outside, I made this Bulgogi in a frying pan.

1 kg/2 lb thinly sliced sirloin or rib eye

4 stalks of spring onion

2 julienned carrots

Lettuce

Marinade
1 dl pureed pear
1 dl applesauce
1 dl finely chopped onion
4 cloves crushed garlic
1 teaspoon  grated ginger
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
1 teaspoon sesame oil
2 stalks of green onion

1 shredded carrots

Put all the ingredients in a blender/food processor except carrot and green onions and mash all ingredients into a puree.
Cut spring onions and grate the carrot.
Mix the meat, marinade and vegetables except the lettuce in a bowl and let it sit 3 hours or over night in the refrigerator.
If you keep it in the fridge you take the meat out a few hours so the meat has room temperature before bbq it.  Serve the meat on lettuce with carrots and spring onion.

Hotteok, filled Korean pancakes

Hotteok is typical korean street food snack served during the cold winter months, it made from a chewy dough often filled with sugar, ground peanuts and toasted sesame seeds
I got to know these when we used to live in South Korea. We were out on a sunday walk and we passed a food truck, the air was filled with the aroma of sweet cinnamon. As a foodie I had to stop an see what this was.
It is said that hotteok originated from Chinese merchants who immigrated to Korea during the late 19th century. Unlike the Chinese pancakes, which usually are filled with savory meat fillings, hotteok are stuffed with sweet fillings, to suit Koreans’ tastes.

Makes: 10  4″ pancakes

1,5 cup all purpose flour

1/2 cup sweet rice flour

3/4 tsp salt

1 tsp instant dry yeast

3/4 cup luke warm water (40-45  C)+  optionally 2~3 tbsp more

1 tsp sugar

vegetable oil for frying

Filling:1/2 cup unbleached sugar (brown sugar is also good)

1/2 tsp cinnamon powder

1/4 cup chopped peanuts

Combine all the ingredients in a bowl and mix and knead well. the dough is a little sticky, cover the bowl and let it rise for about 1-2 hours or double in size.

Divide the dough in 10 equal parts, flatten the dough and fill it with 1-2 tsp of the filling.

Roll the filled dhough in a little oil and fry them on a girdle or a in a pan.
Flatten the dough while you are frying them to about 0,5 cm.
When the pancakes star to bubble and rise, turn and fry the other side.
The pancakes are best eaten warm, but be carefull the filling is very hot.

Kaldereta, Filipino stew

This dish with Spanish influence is a popular in the Philippines and often served on special occasions and a regular in every Filipino cookbook.

My family loves Beef Kaldereta and this was my dad speciality. This stew as with any stew it takes time and patience but it is worth the wait.
According to Wikipedia this was originally made with goat meat. Today it is more common to use beef, but you can use chicken or pork too, my dad used to hunt elk and made the stew with self caught meat. I prefer beef and I must admit that when I heard that you had to use liver pate to make the sauce nice and smooth, I was a little skeptical, but I’ve never noticed any liver taste before, so why should I react now. It’s actually the first time I make it, my mother made one on the top and bottom picture and mine is in the middle.
Kaldereta comes from the word caldero meaning cauldron

You need

 

 

1 kilo beef, cubed
1 large chopped onion
3 crushed garlic cloves
4 tbsp olive oil
1 dl soy sauce
2 tbsp white wine vinegar / lemon juice
4 bay leaves
2 cans crushed tomatoes
4 tablespoons tomato paste
2 Red bell pepper cut into strips
1,5 dl liverspread
5 dl potatoes cubed
2 dl green olives
2 dl green peas
2-3 chilli pepper (optional)
A handful of chopped parsley for garnish
Saute beef, onion, garlic in olive oil, add the bay leaves, soy sauce and white wine vinegar and bring to a boil, when it starts to bubble, put the heat down to second lowest and let the meat simmer under cover until tender.
I let it simmer for approximately 2 hours
Remove the liquid, but save it for later.
Add tomatoes and tomato paste with the beef , stirring and add the liquid you just drained a little at the time and taste till you get the saltines you want.

Add the rest of the ingredient and let it simmer untill the potatoes are tender.

Eat this with rice.

Molo soup/won ton soup

Apparently Wonton means to swallow a cloud, the little dumplings look like little clouds floating around in the soup and the Filipino name Molo is from a place in the Philippines they say the Filipino version come from.
I -2  packets of wonton wrappers
400 minced pork
250 g kminced prawns
100 g ffinly chopped water chesnuts
1 tbs soysace
1 tbs oystersauce
1 tbs sherry
1/2 ts sugar
a few drops of sesame oil
1 sping onion chopped
1 ts grated fresh ginger
mix everything well and put a teaspoon full on each wrapper
This portion gave me about 70 wontons
Heat up 2 to 2,5 liters of chicken broth and when it is boiling put the dumplings in and let it simmer
for 10-15 minutes.
garnish with prefered vegetables. In the picture above I have enoki mushrooms, cilantro, chilli and chopped spring onions in my soup.
These dumplings are nice to fry also and serve with sweet chilli sauce