Soft and fluffy Hokkaido milk bread

Milk bread recipe

Holy Moly, if I had just known about Tangzhong earlier, I would have used this method when baking sweet buns a long time ago, worst of all I lived in Asia during the 1990s when this japanese technique got popularized through the book The 65° Bread Doctor. Using this method allows bread to stay fresh longer without needing to use artificial preservatives. I used to enjoy savory filled milk bread while living in Hong kong and little did I know back then that the technique used was quite new, I learnt this method much later.

Tangzhong-water roux is usually one part flour to 5 parts water, but you can use milk or a combination of both. The best ratio for using this is, for every 100 g of flour you need 35 g of Tangzhong

These Hokkaido milk bread are the mother of all fluffy buns.

What is Tanzhong? Well it is just a simple paste made out of flour and milk that you heat up, it is similar to a roux when making sauce, but without the butter. The paste which is the starter, is then mixed into the dough and will produce the most soft and bouncy bread.

Why that happens, I do not know, but I experimented with something similar a little while ago, I made sour cream doughnuts and used a choux pastry base and got super fluffy drop doougnuts see recipe HERE

FLOUR PASTE
5 tbsp milk
1 tbsp flour
DOUGH
5 dl flour
0,6 dl sugar
1 packet active dry yeast
1 teaspoon salt
1 egg
1,25 dl warm whole milk
4 tablespoons butter, cut into pieces and softened at room temperature, plus a little extra for buttering baking pan.

EGG WASH
1 egg
1 tbsp milk

 

First you make the starter, in a small pot, whisk flour and milk together until smooth. Bring to a simmer over medium-low heat and cook, stirring often until it thickens. When it’s ready, the spoon will leave tracks on the bottom of the pot. Put the mixture in a cup and lightly cover the surface with plastic wrap. Set aside to cool to room temperature.

Mix all the dry ingredients in a baking bowl .

In a separate bowl mix the milk, egg and the Tangzhong and then pour it into the bowl with the dry ingredients. Mix and knead until everything is combined for 5 minutes or so. (I used all of the tangzhong I made I did not weigh it, but I guess the amount was in the vicinity of 35%)

Add the soft butter and knead another until the butter is incorporated and then knead 10 minutes until the dough is smooth and springy and just a bit sticky.

Shape the dough into a ball and cover with a kitchen towel and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size, 40 to 60 minutes.

Punch the dough down and knead lightly and reshape the dough into a ball, cover again and let rise 15 minutes.

Butter a cake tin.

Tip the dough out on a lightly floured work surface and roll it in to a sausage and divide into 9 equal parts.

Shape each part in to round balls. Loosely cup hand around dough and, without applying pressure to dough, move hand in small circular motions. Place the buns into the prepared pan. Cover the pan loosely with plastic wrap and let the rolls rest for another 30-40 minutes, until puffy.

Japanese milk bread

Pre heat the oven to 180 C.

Brush the tops with the egg wash and bake in the middle of the oven until golden brown, 25-30 minutes

Let cool in the pan 10 minutes, then remove to a wire rack and let cool at least 1 hour, to let the crust soften and keep the crumb lofty. (If cut too soon, the air bubbles trapped in the bread will deflate.)

Hokkaido milk bread

 

 

Tonkatsu, Japanese schnitzel or Dongas in Korean

Exploring some of my Japanese heritage, funny thing though, I was 14 when I first ate at a Japanese reataurant. My great great grandfather was Japanese, unfortunately I do not know his name, but my great grand father was Pedro Nakamura y Gonzales. There can’t be that many Filipinos back then with that name so if anyoneelse has ties to him or know of him please let me know. He was married to Gabina Platon Burgos. One of my many hobbies is geneology, but I am sort of stuck with my side of the tree. My childrens three on their father side I have been able to go back centuries.

Tonkatsu is the japanese version of a Schnitzel, made with thin slices of pork sirloin. Originally these were made with beef and called Katsuretsu. It is said that the pork version was invented at a restaurant in Tokyo called Renegatei in 1899. The dish was seen as a “Yoshoku” a Japanese version of European cuisine. Some say that it was the Portuguese who brought Tonkatsu to Japan in the late 1800s. The portuguese arrived much earlier and at the end of the 1800s. In this period of history many countries had attempted to get a foothold in Japan, so who brought the dish to japan is somewhat uncertain, my theory i that it was those who invented the wiener schnitzel.

Tonkatsu is usually served with thinly sliced cabbage and a dark sauce called Tonkatsu sauce, a type of mustard (Karashi) and preferably with a slice of lemon or two along with rice and miso soup.
When we lived in South Korea we got it served with kimchi and kim and the dish is called Dongas. Kim is the same as Nori, the difference between Kim and Nori is that Kim as a side dish is often toasted with a little oil and lightly salted.
We often bought kim in little rectangular pieces, you it by placing a pice on top of your rice and pick up a mouthful of rice with chop sticks. If you want to eat this with kimchi, HERE is a recipe.

Tonkatsu sauce

1 dl ketchup
1/2 dl Worchestershire sauce
1/2 dl sake
1 tbsp grated fresh ginger
1 tbsp grated fresh garlic
1-2 tsp of sugar
3 tbsp mirin

Combine all the ingredients in a saucepan and bring to a boil and stir-
Turn down the heat and simmer for 25-30 minutes. Remove the foam that forms on top and let the sauce cool slightly before serving.

Tonkatsu
500 g pork sirloin
salt and pepper to taste
2 eggs
4-5 tablespoons flour
salt and pepper to taste
4 dl panko crumbs
Oil for frying, not olive oil

Cut the meat into thin slices, about 1/2 cm thickness. If you want you can give the pieces a couple of whacks with a meat tenderizer. Salt and pepper slightly or to taste.

Pour oil in a deep sauce pan and set on medium heat.


Beat the eggs, salt and pepper in a bowl.
Put the flour and panko in separate bowl.

Flour both sides of the meat and make sure it is completely covered, then dip it in the egg and finally in panko crumbs
Fry until golden.
Keep the meat warm in the oven in an ovenproof dish at approximately 150 ° C while you fry the rest.
If you are going to eat this with chop sticks, cut the Tonkatsu into strips before serving.Plate the tonkatsu and serve it with rice and miso soup, and other side dishes you want.

Mung bean and coconut stew with centella

Mung bean and coconut stew

The past few weeks I have posted a couple of mung bean stews, one that I grew up with(see recipe HERE) and one with lechon leftovers(see recipe HERE), this time I am making an all vegan mung bean caserolle with coconut milk. In the traditional filipino dish you use malunggay leaves for this dish, but this time I had some centella leaves so I used that instead.

Centella is used as a leafy green in Sri Lankan cuisine. In Vietnam and Thailand, this leaf is used for preparing a drink or can be eaten in raw form in salads. These leaves are considered quite nutritious. The leaves has also been used as a medicinal herb in Ayurvedic medicine and traditional Chinese medicine, and it is also known as the Asiatic pennywort.

When my cousin heard I was making this she said that I should add Jack fruit. Funny thing, because I have read that in Sri Lankan cuisine they use centella in a coconut curry with Jack fruit. I am unfortunately allergic to Jack fuit, so no Jack fruit in this dish, but a little curry paste would be tempting.

Centella

2 cups mung beans

1 tablespoon oil

1 finely chopp onion

2 cloves minced garlic

1 tbsp freshly grated ginger

1-2 tsp chili flakes

1,2 l vegetable broth

1 can coconut milk

1-2  tbsp fish sauce

1 bunch centella

Salt and pepper to taste

 

Wash mung beans thoroughly and strain. Soak beans in water and stir, remove floating particles.

Mung bean stew 1 agj

In a saucepan, sauté garlic, onion and ginger in a pot until soft and fragrant, add the chili flakes and give it a stir.

Add the broth, coconut milk and the rinsed mung beans and bring to a boil.

Turn the heat down and simmer, stir occasionally until beans are tender about 40-50 minutes.

Mung beans and coconut 1 agj

Right before you serve add the centella leaves to let them wilt a little.

Mungo

 

Banh xeo, Vietnamese sizzling crepes

I have been wanting to try this crepe at a Vietnamese restaurant in Oslo, but each time I have been there I have been too late, either they have been out or that they have stopped making them for the day.

I saw the pan cake on instagram @kokofoodie, now I really had to try them. They looked so good and crunchy, I love crunchy. Earlier I had only heard about the crepes, from my friend Frk. Fabelaktig, she is my source for Vietnamese food and when we have a lunch date we usually got to a restaurant in Oslo called Lille Saigon 1, this restaurant even got a raving review in the New York Times a little while ago. Since I have not tried the real deal yet, I can’t compare my crepe with a Vietnamese made one. I really have to get my glutinous maximus to this restaurant ASAP. Anyhow after googling I decided to try out this recipe with my twist on it of course:D

  • 500 g rice flour
  • 2-3 cups water
  • 2 cans coconut milk
  • 1 tbsp ground turmeric
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 bunch spring onions (scallions), chopped
  • vegetable oil

Filling

  • 500 g cooked pork belly thinly sliced ( I had leftover pork roast)
  • 500 g bean sprouts
  • onion, sliced (I used scallions and garlic, I was out of onion)
  • 500 g small fresh raw shrimps,I removed the heads
  • Lettuce, Vietnamese basil, mint and coriander leaves, to serve

 

Prepare the filling and prepare the batter by mixing the rice flour with water, coconut mik, turmeric, salt and chopped shallots.

In a frying pan, heat just enough oil to cover the pan (tip-off excess) and fry a spoonful of the scallion and garlic(onion), shrimps and for a couple of minutes.

Pour batter mixture into the pan. Tilt the pan so that the mixture spreads thinly.  When the batter begins to crisp around the edge, add some pork, bean sprouts and chopped scallions.beansprouts. Make sure the edges do not stick to the pan by brushing a little more oil around the edge of the pancake.

Fold one half of the pancake over the ingredients and slip onto serving plate. Serve with fresh herbs.

 

 

Munggo with lechon

 

Mungo with lechon

My cousine have never made mung bean stew when I come over for a bite to eat, because she knew that I used to hate it, but last time I went to visit her she hade made a pot of the stew. I read on your blog that you like munggo now, so I made some.

Wow, this was a munggo dish I never tried befor. My cousin had made this stew with Lechon left overs and it tasted heavenly, had I had this type of mung bean stew when I was younger I would have liked it a  lot more. HERE is the recipe for the mung bean stew I have been used to.

You make this stew the same way you make the traditional stew, but with roasted pig that you call lechon in the Philippines. As greens this time I have used Corchorus known as Saluyot in the Philippines. Rumor has it that this herb is one of Cleopatras anti wrinkle remedies, you can read about it HERE.

1  cup Mung beans

1 tbsp minced garlic

chilipepper flakes for heat if you want

300-500 g Lechon left overs( use what you have)

1 medium-sized tomato, chopped

1 medium-sized onion, chopped

2 tbsp fish sauce

1 liter water(for boiling) if you want this more like a soup add more water

1 pc pork/beef cube or 1 teaspoon beef stock(for flavoring)

1-2 cups chopped or pulled malunggay leaves (or spinach)

salt and pepper to taste

Wash mung beans thoroughly and strain.

Soak beans in water and stir. Remove floating particles.

Mung bean stew 1 agj

In a saucepan sauté onion, garlic and pepper flakes, add lechon and chopped tomatoes.

Pour in beans with water, add stock cube and bring to a boil. Turn the heat down to medium heat and simmer, stir occasionally until beans are tender about 30-40 minutes.

Right before serving add the saluyot leaves, do not boil the leaves, they will become very slimy.

Tom Yum Goong

I have no knowlege of Thai food exept that I love eating it, and of course I have to try to make some of the dishes I have eaten. This time I am trying to make Tom Yum Goong a spicy sour soup commonly eaten in Thailand and Laos.

Tom Yum Goong is the most well-known variety of the Tom Yum soups and makes use of shrimp as the main ingredient of the dish, but you may also use firm flesh fish, Tom Yum Taleh, or chicken,Tom Yum Gai..

I cheated this time and used ready-made Tom Yum paste, just to try out making the dish. I followed the instructions on the paste tub. It wasn’t to bad, but I think next time I am going to try make it from scratch.

Dinner for 4
1 liter water
100 g Tom Yum paste
30 g galangang
60 g lemmongrass
100 g mushrooms
500 g shrimps
3 tablespoons fish sauce
3 tablespoons lime juice
8 kaffir leaves

Combine water, paste, galangang, lemongrass and kaffir lime leaves in a sauce pan and boil. Reduce the heat to low heat and add the shrimp and mushrooms, add fish sauce and lime juce.

Eat with rice or noodles.

Mussles in coconut milk, Ginataang tahong

20140901_190828ftsq agj

I was visiting my mum and she made Ginataang Tahong or Mussels cooked in Coconut Milk for dinner, this dish is a common Filipino dish. I understand that mussels are abundant and cheap in coastal areas so a dish like this is a regular feature on the dining table.

I usually eat mussels with bread or fries, but since this a Filipino dish we enjoy this with rice.

 

1 kg fresh mussels, cleaned

1 regular can coconut milk

1 medium onion, minced

2 cloves garlic, crushed

2 tbsp ginger, cut in thin strips

1 cup chopped spinach

1 tbsp fish sauce

Chili, salt and pepper to taste

2 tbsp cooking oil

 

Heat the cooking oil in a cooking pot, saute the garlic, onion, and ginger

Pour-in the coconut milk and let it boil and thiken a bit.

Add, spinach, fish sauce, chili, and salt and pepper to taste

Put the mussels in the pot, stir and cook for 3 to 5 minutes or until the mussels open up

Serve with steamed rice or noodles. Share and enjoy!

 

 

Colorful Thai coleslaw

Green papaya salad agj

This salad is based on a Thai green papaya salad, but in this one I only use green papaya,red cabbage and carrots. So that is why I called it a slaw.

This salad is nice with a lot of different Asian dishes.

Ike’s Vietnamese Fish Sauce Wings

I got very curious when I read about these wings on this Blog 

I had to try to make it so I googled the recipe, I have never been to the Restaurant in Portland Oregon that serves them and never had them roadside from a stall in Saigon, so I do not know if they taste the same. But I can tell you that we love them, even picky eater MiniMe loves them.

I found the recipe HERE The story is that Ike carried this recipe around with him until he opened his restaurant Pok PokI have made these wings a few times since I first posted them on my norwegian blog back in October 31. 2011, and I have even made the dish with pork.

I tried the wings with just the syrup and it was very sweet and salty, and then I tasted a wing with the syrup, crispy garlic, chopped cilantro, mint and chili. WOW what a flavor bomb and I highly recommended that you try to make these.

Dan: Mum, it is so strange, that dish really stinks, but it is really yummy. I knew that you were making this dish, I could smell it outside.

We eat this with plain jasmine rice and a salad of shredded cucumber, mango (sour / sweet), chopped green onion and a little salt and pepper, to balance the salty wings.

I doubled the coriander and mint,and added chili.

  • 1/2 cup Asian fish sauce
  • 1/2 cup superfine sugar
  • 4 garlic cloves, 2 crushed and 2 minced
  • 3 pounds chicken wings, split at the drumettes
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, plus more for frying
  • 1 cup cornstarch
  • 2 tablespoon chopped fresh coriander
  • 2 tablespoon chopped mint
  • 1 tablespoon chopped chili
  1. In a bowl, whisk the fish sauce, sugar and crushed garlic. Add the wings and toss to coat. Refrigerate for 3 hours, tossing the wings occasionally.
  2. Heat the 2 tablespoons of oil in a small skillet. Add the minced garlic; cook over moderate heat until golden, 3 minutes. Drain on paper towels.
  3. In a large pot, heat 2 inches of oil to 350°. Pat the wings dry on paper towels; reserve the marinade. Put the cornstarch in a shallow bowl, add the wings and turn to coat. Fry the wings in batches until golden and cooked through, about 10 minutes. Drain on paper towels and transfer to a bowl.
  4. In a small saucepan, simmer the marinade over moderately high heat until syrupy, 5 minutes. Strain over the wings and toss. Top with the cilantro, mint, fried garlic and chili.

Pancit Palabok

“Come over for dinner Analiza I’ll make you some Pancit Palabok” my cousin texted me, she is along with my mum one of my sources for Filipino food.

Pancit palabok is another example of Filipino’s love of noodles. This noodle dish though comes covered with a thick red shrimp-flavored sauce, and a mishmash of toppings such as fried garlic bits, boiled shrimp, smoked fish flakes, crushed pork cracklings and hard-boiled eggs.

2015-04-02 17.32.39

The first time I tried this dish was as a kid, at a Filipino party I was handed a plate with noodles slathered in red meat sauce, and thinking it was something else I took a big bite. It wasn’t something else it was this dish, my face stiffened in a probably strange grimace and I might have gaged too as little children sometimes do. Today though I like the dish, they say that if you try something 25 times you will begin to like it.

2015-04-12 04.09.00

Serves 4

1 pack (1 lb) rice noodles (bihon)

2015-04-12 04.12.41

 

Sauce

2 tbsp cooking oil

400 g ground pork

1 tbsp anatto powder

3 cups pork broth

1 piece shrimp cube( bullion)

3-4 tablespoons cornstarch, 1/4 cup cold water

2 tbsp fish sauce

½ tsp ground black pepper

2015-04-12 04.13.19b

Toppings

2 pieces fried firm tofu (tokwa), cubed

½ cup tinapa flakes (smoked fish)

½ cup chicharon, pounded(pork rind)

2 hard boiled eggs,sliced

½ cup cooked shrimps (boiled or steamed)

¼ cup green onion or scallions, finely chopped

3 tbsp fried garlic

2 pieces lemon, sliced (or 6 to 8 pieces calamansi)

2015-04-12 04.09.00

Instructions

Soak the rice noodles in water for about 15 minutes. Drain and set aside.

Saute the minced pork in a deep pan with oil until cooked, about 5 minutes.

Dilute the annato powder in pork broth then pour the mixture in the saucepan.

Bring to a boil (If you are using anatto seeds, soak them first in 3 tbsp water to bring-out the color)

Add the shrimp cube and stir and simmer for 3 minutes

Add the corn starch mix gradually while stirring.

Add the fish sauce and ground black pepper then simmer until sauce becomes thick. Set aside.

Meanwhile, boil enough water in a pot.

Place the soaked noodles in a strainer (use metal or bamboo strainer) then submerge the strainer in the boiling water for about a minute or until the noodles are cooked. (make sure that the noodles are still firm)

Remove the strainer from the pot and drain the liquid from the noodles.

Place the noodles on a serving plate.

Pour the sauce on top of the noodles then arrange the toppings over the sauce.

Serve with a slice of lemon or calamansi. Share and enjoy!